A visit to my Stateroom by two officers from Police Scotland

Two Police officers called on me today as a former girlfriend – a younger lawyer – was worried about me.  I had not been on Twitter since 5th May and had not responded to emails.  I explained that I had not been paid by a law firm, that I had no internet connection credits or telephone credits – nor did I receive any pension payment from the DWP.  The DWP will sort it out – but say that it would take them 5 weeks!  They had no idea what I could do for food in the meantime. Utterly useless department.   I asked the Police officers if they could let my friend know that I was OK.  They were very happy to do so and my friend sent me some money so I could actually buy some food to eat.

I am a fan of The Scottish Police.  Helpful men and women.

I was 64 last week.  A strange birthday eating sugar and drinking tea.  I had sugar and Tea bags! No food as law firm failed to pay and DWP failed to send money due to me.

But, life can only get better.  It certainly can’t get worse!  I plan to live until I am 100 to get as much pension money from our utterly useless Government.. onwards and upwards. Have a good week.

 

 

The latest issue of the Internet Newsletter for Lawyers is now published.

The latest issue of the Internet Newsletter for Lawyers is now published. The PDF issue is attached. Print subscribers will receive their print issues shortly.

In this issue

  • Legal services – Delia Venables reviews the 50 plus companies (as distinct from law firms) selling legal documents and services online
  • Tribunals – Jamie Anderson of Trinity Chambers reviews the Employment Tribunals Decisions now on GOV.UK
  • Websites – Sue Bramall of Berners Marketing looks at mistakes to avoid in commissioning a website
  • Intranets – Helen Dewar describes the process of commissioning a new intranet for Leigh Day
  • Technology – Alex Heshmaty of Legal Words explains what smart contracts are and the current and potential uses
  • Publications and events – Nick Holmes rounds up the latest lawtech publications, launches and events

Access the Newsletter online

The latest issue of the Internet Newsletter for Lawyers is now published. The PDF issue is attached. Print subscribers will receive their print issues shortly.

In this issue

  • Legal services – Delia Venables reviews the 50 plus companies (as distinct from law firms) selling legal documents and services online
  • Tribunals – Jamie Anderson of Trinity Chambers reviews the Employment Tribunals Decisions now on GOV.UK
  • Websites – Sue Bramall of Berners Marketing looks at mistakes to avoid in commissioning a website
  • Intranets – Helen Dewar describes the process of commissioning a new intranet for Leigh Day
  • Technology – Alex Heshmaty of Legal Words explains what smart contracts are and the current and potential uses
  • Publications and events – Nick Holmes rounds up the latest lawtech publications, launches and events

Access the Newsletter online

BEETHOVEN: Life of an Artist, by Susan Lund

beethoven

BEETHOVEN: Life of an Artist, by Susan Lund is a modern look at Beethoven and his place in our world today. It follows the author’s discovery that Beethoven had a son. He fathered a child with a married woman and the child was brought up by the woman and her husband.

Over 200 years ago, while at the Bohemian spa of Teplitz, Beethoven wrote his Immortal Beloved letter.

Leading musical scholar Maynard Solomon later discovered that Antonie Brentano was Beethoven’s Immortal Beloved. Building on Solomon’s research Susan Lund discovered that Beethoven was the father of her sixth and last child, Karl Josef.

From Bohemia, Franz Brentano took his pregnant wife back to their home in Frankfurt. Beethoven returned alone to Vienna.

Karl Josef grew up a normal, healthy child, advanced, until the age of four when he was stricken with an illness which left him partially paralysed; with the mental age of a four year old.

Without Karl Josef, and his mother’s anguish over his spiritual development, would we have had the Missa Solemnis? Not even a Christian, let alone a Catholic, Beethoven might have written a Mass for the Archduke Rudolph’s inauguration; but it would not have been that Mass.

Aimed at the general reader as well as the academic, BEETHOVEN: Life of an Artist is an easy read, accurate and informative, containing new information about the composer’s life.

The book looks at the effect of biographical events upon his music, especially his last major works: the last piano sonatas; the Missa Solemnis and the Choral; and the late quartets. Changes in society are examined, from Beethoven’s time to ours, such as the social stigma of illegitimacy, marriage within class, and the indissolubility of marriage within the Catholic Church prevalent in Vienna in Beethoven’s lifetime.

Susan Lund is author of 12 books including ‘Raptus: A novel about Beethoven’, ‘Beethoven and the Catholic Brentanos’ and ‘Passion’. NEW BOOK: Beethoven: Life of an Artist by Susan Lund

 

 

Rive Gauche: Cleaner clears up Hirst’s ashtray art

It is often said that modern art is rubbish, but never did it ring as true as when an art gallery cleaner binned a work by Damien Hirst because he thought the installation was exactly that – leftover rubbish.Emmanuel Asare thought the piles of full ashtrays, half-filled coffee cups, empty beer bottles and newspapers strewn across the gallery were the remnants of a party in the west London gallery.

Although that is what it was, this rubbish had been arranged by Hirst into an impromptu installation, which increased its value by thousands.

Hirst had arrived at the launch party of a new exhibition of his work, Painting-By-Numbers, on Tuesday night at the Eyestorm gallery. When asked how he would like his prints to be displayed in the windows, the artist, famed for his formaldehyde animals, decided to create a new work.

The next morning when Mr Asare arrived for work, he decided to clean up the mess straight away by putting it all in bin bags. Mr Asare said: “As soon as I clapped eyes on it I sighed because there was so much mess.

“I didn’t think for a second that it was a work of art – it didn’t look much like art to me. So I cleared it all into binbags and dumped it.”

Staff were dispatched to find the binbags in the rubbish, and salvaged the various objects, which they used to reconstruct the installation from photographs taken earlier.

Hirst, 35, said the piles of junk represented an artist’s studio and said the mistake was “fantastic. Very funny.”

Charles Thomson, co-founder of the Stuckist art movement, which favours the traditional skills of drawing and painting, praised Mr Asare’s action.

“The cleaner obviously ought to be promoted to an art critic of a national newspaper. He clearly has a fine critical eye and can spot rubbish, just as the child could see that the emperor wasn’t wearing any new clothes,” he said.

And while I am on the subject of ‘nonsense’ – the current vogue for being awarded Blue Ticks on Twitter is becoming absurd.  I have no desire to have a Blue Tick or any other honour I have not awarded to myself.

I have awarded myself a RED Tick on a black background. “I have a Red Tick, therefore I exist? ”

Cogito, ergo sum?  or perhaps, after a glass or two of vino rosso… Bibendo, ergo sum?

And here is Roger Scruton: Roger Scruton – I Drink Therefore I Am, A Philosophers Guide to Wine

Scots Independence

This, sent to me by a friend, made me laugh!

 

If Scotland gains its independence in any forthcoming referendum, the remainder of the United Kingdom will be known as the “Former United Kingdom,” or FUK.
In a bid to discourage the Scots from voting “yes” in the referendum, the Government is intending to campaign with the slogan
“Vote NO, for FUK’s sake.” They feel the Scottish voters will be able to relate to this.

 

The most beautiful places in Scotland

The Most Beautiful Places in Scotland
Rachel Summers

Scotland is home to some of the most stunning and breath-taking locations within the UK and will definitely not disappoint any passing visitor. We have created a list of some of Scotland’s most beautiful places and locations that you simply must visit whilst in the country.

Edinburgh

We are going to start off with one of the most popular destinations in Scotland; Edinburgh. You simply cannot create a list about Scotland’s most beautiful places without featuring Edinburgh. Edinburgh is home to Edinburgh Castle and contains the famous Royal Mile. If you are lucky enough to visit the city, the amazing picturesque city skylines will not disappoint any traveller and the town has often been called “olde worldly” as well as “gothic” which you can imagine what beautiful sights a place like that has to offer.

Edinburgh, being the capital city, is a place for almost every type of traveller. Whether you are in the city for business, partying, relaxing or a romantic break then you will find things within the city that suit all of your holiday or visiting needs.

Loch Ness

Popular for camping, Loch Ness is a simply stunning area that is surrounded by mountains, villages and the ruins of Urquhart Castle. Loch Ness goes on for around 23 miles so is very popular for those who are wanting to escape into the peace and quiet. Loch Ness is the perfect place to pitch a tent and have a romantic, quiet getaway for a long weekend.

While visiting, be sure to keep an eye out for Nessie! Will you be one of the lucky few to spot her during your stay?

Fairy Pools – Skye

The name by itself shows off just how magical the place is to visit. Fairy Pools, which is located in Skye, features waterfalls that have been carved through rock that runs down into the vividly turquoise pool beneath. It truly is an enchanting, magical place that will not disappoint and will live up to its name.

Ben Nevis

Ben Nevis is one of the most well-known places in Scotland and for very good reason. Once you have hiked all the way to the peak of Ben Nevis your reward is the spectacular, breath-taking views that oversee the amazing Grampian Mountains. Although, Ben Nevis certainly is not for the faint hearted as it is the highest mountaintop in the whole of the UK.

Edinburgh Castle

While visiting Edinburgh you cannot go home before going visit Edinburgh Castle. Edinburgh Castle, which overlooks the city, is the singularly most popular (paid) tourist attraction in Scotland. As you walk around the Castle you will come across exhibits such as the Stone of Destiny and the Crown Jewels.

Finnich Glen

Finnich Glen is one of the most stunning places you could visit whilst you are in Scotland. The vivid green moss covers all of the walls which offers a beautiful stage for the water that flows across the red sandstone which resembles the look of a river filled with blood – an unquestionably beautiful and yet strange sight to behold.

Discovering More in Scotland

There are far too many places within Scotland to name on this single list alone, but if you are wanting to do further research into places you would love to visit then websites such as Metro and Huffington Post are great for discovering further lists. I’m sure that you will find many more places in Scotland that you would love to have on your itinerary – perhaps a second and third visit should be on the cards to fit them all in!