Law Review: Parting is such sweet sorrow says Murdoch…to Rebekah “Get thee to a nunnery”

Following the news today… Murdoch holding his head in his hands while apologising to the Dowler family and the resignation of Rebekah Brooks, I thought it might be time to return to look at what is happening in other law stories. (It was, of course, Shakespeare who coined the Parting and nunnery quotes!)

RollonFriday has an extraordinary story… BREAKING: Senior Allen & Overy partner in court over child pornography – A senior capital markets lawyer in Allen & Overy’s New York office was arrested yesterday and charged with downloading and distributing child pornography. Edward De Sear appeared in wrist and ankle shackles in a Newark court yesterday following the execution of an arrest warrant at his home. De Sear has been released on $250,000 bail and will have to wear an electronic tag.

Lord Justice Leveson: profile of phone-hacking inquiry chairman

The Guardian: Examination of News of the World scandal and media regulation will be led by Rose West prosecutor, now a senior judge

Become-a-barrister.com hints at bars to the bar

Alex Aldridge writes in the Guardian: Working-class students get all kinds of mixed messages when they investigate their chances of becoming a barrister – well worth a look.  I am delighted to see that Alex has started a blog. 

Given the criticism of the judiciary in recent months on privacy, human rights and sundry other matters by the press, politicians pushing their agenda and others it was interesting to see The lord chief justice, Lord Judge respond in a speech at the Mansion House, reported by the Butterworth and Bowcott blog in The Guardian

A problem we have had to confront this year has been the increased number of critical attacks on individual judges and the judiciary as a whole,” he declared. He might have mentioned European judges and prisoners’ voting rights or David Cameron’s reference to judges making up the law on privacy but he did not.

“This year there has been a steady flow [of attacks], sometimes by those who should know better and sometimes by those who choose to ignore what they know …

“We do not act or give judgment according to our personal whims and wishes. When we apply the laws as we find them to be, we are independent judges.

A special shout out to law professor Richard Moorhead of Cardiff University for his  excellent blogging at the Lawyer Watch…. “Those of us who have worked in legal aid for any length of time are familiar with the chimes of doom that from time to time sound around us….” Worth adding to your reading if you don’t already follow him.

Many of us have been pre-occupied with the Murdoch news… but there are other important legal stories about – a selection from the blogs…

UK Human Rights blog:  “Two most important courts for UK human rights – the Supreme Court and the European Court of Human Rights – both releasing pairs of landmark judgments in Al Rawi / Tariq, on the use of secret evidence in civil proceedings, and Al-Skeini / Al-Jedda, on where in the world the European Convention applies.”

David Allen Green, at his Jack of Kent blog, considers the issue Who is David Rose? a fascinating story  in relation to the Johann Hari ‘issue’ of plagiarism et al.

I am pleased to note…from John Bolch at Family Lore:  Edgar Venal wins the Venal & Grabbit Family Lawyer of the Year Award!

And… Obiter J helps us catch up with this excellent round up: What has happened apart from the “phone-hacking” debacle?

And.. if you fancy a bit of hard legal analysis on the #hackedoff NoTW / News International issues…. the Without Prejudice podcast below will give you a view… and a US lawyer’s view also…. of potential problems ahead with the FBI investigation into News Corporation.

One thought on “Law Review: Parting is such sweet sorrow says Murdoch…to Rebekah “Get thee to a nunnery”

  1. .. or, as Shakespeare’s Cymbeline would have it – “Two of the sweet’st companions in the world.”

    “No more can I be sever’d from your side, Than can yourself in twain divide” – Henry VI Part 1.

    “Wilt thou be my Dearie?
    When Sorrow wring thy gentle heart ..” — Robert Burns.

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