Vermin in Ermine Breaking News: Newly elevated Tory idiot talks bollocks – suprised?

Howard Flight rapped by PM over ‘breeding’ gaffe

BBC: David Cameron has called on a new Conservative peer to apologise for saying welfare changes will encourage “breeding” among benefit claimants.Labour called Howard Flight’s comments “shameful” and said they showed the Tories were out of touch with people. Mr Cameron said he did not agree with Mr Flight’s words, adding: “I am sure he will want to apologise for them”. Mr Flight, a former Conservative deputy chairman, was named last week as one of more than 20 new Tory peers.

He told the London Evening Standard: “We’re going to have a system where the middle classes are discouraged from breeding because it’s jolly expensive.

“But for those on benefits, there is every incentive. Well, that’s not very sensible.”

So…another Tory makes a nasty remark.  They appear to have form…. and now this buffoon gets to sit the in The House of Lords…. astonishing. Makes one proud to be British…. not.

Oh…LOOK… here is another Tory keeping up a fine tradition…….

17 thoughts on “Vermin in Ermine Breaking News: Newly elevated Tory idiot talks bollocks – suprised?

  1. Art – the remark was crass…. hardly a hanging offence… but the concept could have been better expressed.

    Not all on benefits wish to be…. circumstance. We, in work, are fortunate. I suspect there will be many more who will have to take benefits – and it will probably be heartbreaking for them to do so.

    I accept that there are those who game the system…the tabloids routinely expose the most extreme cases…..

  2. No, heck, we really should thank Labour, Brown, Blair, Johnson, Balls, Cooper, that pair of Miliband’s, Clarke, Blunkett, Harperson, Mandelson, Campbell and many more for a great deal.

    Yes, we must thank them for spending thirteen years breeding a generation of thuggish, idle, ASBO layabouts. A social class encouraged by a massive range of challenge-free benefits. An inherently lazy, workshy, claimant-prioritised element of a British electorate.

    The OECD report on UK employment:

    * 480,000 adults aged 20 and 34 are either on incapacity benefit, disability-related income support, or disability living allowance.

    * UK proportion on disability handouts is almost three times the 1.5% average in the OECD.

    * Britain is far more generous when it comes to sickness and disability handouts than most other countries in Europe, North America and Australasia.

    * UK spending on these benefits is twice the level in France and Germany.

    * 45% of young people on incapacity benefit have a mental health problem such as depression, rather than a physical disability.

    Critics last night said that although it was possible that more young people in Britain were disabled than our industrial competitors, it was unlikely.

    * 2.6 million in the UK are on incapacity benefit,

    * Of these, 1 million have been claiming for a decade.

    * 7% of adults receive a form of disability benefit, compared to 5% in Ireland and 3% in NZ and France.

    * UK spends a massive 1.9% of GDP on disability benefits; exceeded only by Iceland, the Netherlands, Sweden and Norway.

    * Average is just 1.2%; and a mere 0.7% in France.

    * UK, more than 3% of days are lost to sickness, while in Ireland the rate is less than 2%

    * It said: ‘In Ireland and the United Kingdom, it does not pay to take up work for one or two days a week since disability payments are suspended and in-work benefits are not

    Isn’t Mr Flight simply but coarsely declaring the reality under a mild case of tourettes?

  3. I’m concerned that nobody is going to look beyond the crass wording to what are real social issues. I think there’s a grave danger of many refusing to face the issues raised by this. It’s particularly apposite at the moment as we are seeing a number of things combining. I’d point a finger at a lot of the career politicians who have really done much to undermine the status of what were once considered honourable, dare I say, aspirational skilled working class careers. Now, for sure, de-industrialisation has played enormously into this picture, but all through work, I see what is little respect for the skilled technician place as, somehow, below the status of the masters of soft-skills. To often I see HR people and senior in companies treating those with technical skills as mere hired-hands with easily replaceable and interchangeable items (carbon units) to be bought and traded. We have, in the UK, got little respect to the type of engineering and technician-lead companies that you find in some parts of the USA and Germany. Frankly we are in the land of the smooth-talking amateur – which also goes for much of politics (or else why do we have Alan Johnson as Shadow Chancellor, a man without an economic clue?)

    What we now see is the aspirations have moved to those of many journalists, life-time politicians and various pundits to a sort of unfocussed definition of education, almost whatever it is, being the route to success. The truth is surely that there are only so many opportunities for generalised skills of this sort. Indeed, in some of the more vocational areas (might I include Law), we are also seeing this oversupply.

    We seem, not, to have made it compulsory to have a degree for many careers that would have previously seen vocational training (the head of Majestic Wines was proudly claiming on R4 just a few weeks ago that his workforce was almost 100% graduate). This extended education period has place the hurdle even higher for the young, their aspiring parents and increased costs enormously. That another 3-4 years of life, and many tens of thousands of pounds of debt have been landed on the the young and their parents for what will, inevitably for many, be shattered illusions, is a huge price.

    This is before the costs of housing are taken into account – many young people remain financially dependent on their parents well into their thirties. The recent moves on child benefit, university fees and the like have made this yet worse.

    I’m not a parent myself, but I know many that are, and quite a few young too. The failure of the promised land of extended education, and its expense is a huge burden for all but the wealthy.

    I should add, that I’m one of those grammar-school educated, upwardly-mobile working class types who got (almost) the best out of what the State could offer. It’[s my contemporaries, often from the same background, whose kids are in the middle of this.

  4. I hold no candle for those who abuse the benefits system…… I can see no reason at all why we should support those who are fit to work and who can get work…… but I do feel that we should (and all governments agree on this) support and assist those in genuine need.

  5. Exceedingly crass and insensitive. He is not the only one at the present time making similar remarks. We seem to have far more than our fair share of arrogant and well-to-do people making life a misery for everyone they can and rubbing salt in their wounds with abysmal comments.

    After some initial high(ish) hopes, the government is demonstrating all the worst features of British politics and politicians.

    Abolition of the Lords will be a very long time coming. Politicians love this patronage system from which they all hope to eventually benefit. For a long time I have thought that the Lords should go and be replaced by an elected reviewing and revising Chamber with similar powers. Not likely to happen though!

  6. charonqc – if I thought it were possible, then lets work on the ‘support & assist genuine need’ with haste.

    First, consider this. Human Rights Act does a great deal for many but is extended to thugs, kidnappers, benefit embezzlers, terrorists, etc. But, does literally nothing for those in combat fighting terrorists for our democratic freedom.

  7. Thank you for this unfanciable Flight. His words are absolute bollocks.

    Context can often add some shade or depth of meaning to a statement. Not in this case. Curiously, a consideration of the context reduces whatever nanite of meaning it may have had in splendid isolation.

    Still bollocks.

    @Polleetickle I for one am glad that the Human Rights Act is extended to parliamentarians and peers.

  8. James C – this is ONE persons thoughts – and clearly isnt a party view.

    The glaring issue for me is that Labour ministers hoodwinked this nation. They did more for themselves without ensuring a lasting AFFORDABLE welfare legacy for the people.

  9. ‘Isn’t Mr Flight simply but coarsely declaring the reality under a mild case of tourettes?’

    err no – he’s just a twat peddling the pathetic bleat that the poor ‘decent middle classes’ are as ever being milked by some quasi-criminal proletarian underclass who should know their place – which is presumably waiting on the likes of the odious mr shite (sorry ‘flight’).

    thing 2
    labour didn’t invent the concept of abusing the system. the whole incapacity scandal was a tory attempt to massage the jobless figures. i agree governments since then should have reformed it. it worries me (for one thing) that the text you quote appears to imply that depression isn’t a real disease.

    thing 3
    and the thing about the human rights act is that it applies to humans. not just humans we like, not just nice humans, not just humans who obey the law, just humans. you qualify by being born. probably why many on the right dislike it.

  10. I’m not sure which is worse. The Silver Fox Statesman who views diplomacy as interchangeable with dishonesty, or the politician who wears his stupidity on his sleeve.

    Incentive to de-fraud is not a class issue.

  11. simplywondered – I’m surprised you didn’t get to stating that I’m detached from reality. tut!

    So, does child abuse, wife beating and human trafficking continue? Is human rights still being extended to terrorists, kidnappers, immigrant overstayers and drugs traffickers on UK soil?

    You probably know where I am coming from becuase I expect you to be cognisant with these subjects.

    As for Labour taking NO responsibility for anything – I am also familiar with that – but do recall depression being clearly exhibited by a demonic Gordon Brown.

    Long live Gillian Duffy.

  12. pollee (i assume we are down to first names now)
    i’ve no idea about your relationship to reality or otherwise – i simply disagree with what you have written above and said so.

    yes, all those things in para 2 continue (relevant???). yes human rights continue to apply to all those people – they are human (see above).

    no – i have no idea where you are coming from. at a pure guess i imagine you are about as ‘cognisant with’ them as i am. (relevant???)

    we really don’t seem to be getting very far with this, do we?

  13. Simply,

    The strange thing about Flighty was that he was making a sensible point about the effect of loading the middle classes with student debt and taxes-it will make it harder for middle class couples, to start a family.

    Instead, he started banging on about the proles breeding and his message was lost.

  14. How can you object to violent thugs being put behind law abiding students for state money. Bizarre world that rewards violent behaviour to the extent that an elected politician is not allowed to make comments on policy designed to prevent it.

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