LawCareers.net reviews Charon and other blawgs…

Adam Smith of LawCareers.net has done a review of several blawgs, including my own.  Good to see a popular website taking the trouble to do a review of blawging.  It may inspire others to blawg?

Read the review here 

6 thoughts on “LawCareers.net reviews Charon and other blawgs…

  1. I think this highlights the conflicting views about the merits of blogging (legal or otherwise) wonderfully.

    Certain LPC providers do provide scare stories (http://mgr-asp.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!F91E9636D57C4A55!1111.entry) actively discouraging the practice. If they’re true, they do result on a lack of anonymity, but that’s not always the easiest thing…

    Conversely, I’d say that if an employer did find a half-decent well written blawg that’s not purely rants, then surely it would show extra skills and that needed ‘life’ outside of the books?

    With the profile of blogs being raised, as shown by this article, perhaps this will become more accepted?

    I must go into hiding from my provider though, just in case ;)

  2. Asp… read the link you provided. Yes…. blawging has some risks… but… surely…. law student blawgers know how to tread the line properly ? …. accuracy is all…..

    Fair comment and honest objectivity…. with a dose of reasoned personal opinion – should not present a problem.

    Putting up a Facebook profile with pictures of debauchery…. great fun… but not so good in the career stakes.

    LPC / BVC providers who are worried about reasoned and substantiated negative comments… may well have something to worry about? However… anonymity (understandable)… in such a case… lessens the value of the objective evaluation or force of criticism to some extent – or does it?
    :-)

  3. Despite having strong-armed my way into the lawcareers review, I’m sort of with the anxious student here. My anonymity, although increasingly precarious, is necessary because I don’t know how my firm would react. There is nothing in my blog that would be a problem, quite the reverse if anything, but most firms are still in ‘we don’t want anything going out that isn’t under our full control’ mode. The same is, I suspect, true to an even greater degree [sic] of law colleges. Let alone with employer’s HR depts reading along. There are risks – which vary according to how desperate one is to be a city clone.

    Part of this is daft – there may be risks and criticisms, but the PR plus and google juice of a well regarded blawg would surely far outweigh them.

    Part isn’t daft – like email, only much more so, never publish anything on a blog etc. that you would not be prepared to espouse face to face, no matter how anonymous you may appear to be.

    Given my time again, and a different situation to start my blog in, I would not be anonymous/pseudonymous. And maybe I might get to do the butterfly thing yet…

  4. I agree with Charon that we should trust law student blawggers to have the intelligence and foresight to be careful about what they publish online. If they can’t be tactful and sensitive then they wouldn’t make good lawyers anyway.

    But I don’t think anonymity lessens the value of an author’s opinions. It can actually be more effective. In many countries opinion can be quashed by a jail term unless the dissident remains anonymous. Stakeholders may want to read “The Handbook for Bloggers and Cyber-Dissidents”. And here’s a related article: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/click_online/6548555.stm

    So, for some (hopefully not NL et al), anonymity is crucial. But do you really believe my name is Adam Smith?

  5. ‘Fair comment and honest objectivity…. with a dose of reasoned personal opinion – should not present a problem.’

    and who on earth wants to read a blog like that?

    ‘if they can’t be tactful and sensitive then they wouldn’t make good lawyers anyway.’

    hmmmm….. dear geek lawyer…

    nearly legal (how on earth did you get away with such a brilliant name! you must get so many dodgy porn searches)

    ‘never publish anything on a blog etc. that you would not be prepared to espouse face to face, no matter how anonymous you may appear to be.’

    nail … head.

  6. Obviously it’s up to the individual blogger to use a little common sense and weigh the risk versus reward equation before breaking cover. Many should be able to do this without it having a negative effect on their careers – for some blogging can be worked to their advantage and cited successfully as another ‘string’ to their academic ‘bow’. At the very least it shows some bona fide interest in law and legal issues.

    And as Charon pointed out, you have to hope that law students have enough sense to make a good judgement call. Rule of thumb, though: If your content largely resembles a gratuitous bitch-fest where you grumble at everything and everyone, or your posts are more suited to the confines of Facebook and the like, best keep your name off it.

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